WHAT

What is COVID-19?


COVID-19 stands for the coronavirus disease, first identified in 2019. COVID-19 is caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2.




What are the COVID-19 variants?


If you are exposed to a virus, it will enter your body and replicate itself, creating more and more copies. A mutation occurs when a virus makes a mistake when replicating. If enough mutations occur and are repeated, it will become a variant strain. A 'variant of concern' is a version of the virus that is typically more infectious and deadly. As of July 2021, there are four COVID-19 variants of concern. The most concerning one in Ontario is the delta variant.




What is the COVID-19 vaccine?


The COVID-19 vaccine is an injection that teaches your body to defend itself from the virus. The vaccines approved by Health Canada are safe and effective. The vaccines rely on mRNA or a non-replicating viral vector to achieve immunity. These vaccines do not inject you with the live virus. You cannot get COVID-19 from the COVID-19 vaccines. A visual illustration of what mRNA is from Virus to Spike Protein to mRNA to the mRNA encapsulated by the vesicle to create the vaccine.




What COVID-19 vaccines are available?


There are two mRNA vaccines and two non-replicating viral vector (NRVV) vaccines approved for use in Canada:

  • Pfizer: 2 doses (mRNA)
  • Moderna: 2 doses (mRNA)
  • AstraZeneca: 2 doses (NRVV)
  • Johnson & Johnson: 1 dose (NRVV)




What is the best COVID-19 vaccine for me to get?


The vaccines approved by Health Canada are all safe and effective. The best vaccination you can get is the first vaccine available to you! If you have concerns about the vaccines, talk to your health care provider. It is safe to mix vaccine brands as recommended by public health guidelines. If you receive an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) as your first dose, you can receive either of the mRNA vaccines as your second dose. If you received AstraZeneca as your first dose, you can receive an mRNA vaccine as your second dose or another dose of AstraZeneca.




What can I expect when I go to get my COVID-19 vaccine?


Experiences can differ across vaccine clinics. Below is what you may expect if you are going to a scheduled appointment:

  1. Arriving and checking in with a volunteer
  2. Answering COVID-19-specific screening questions, and providing your health card*
  3. Sitting down with a qualified healthcare worker to receive your vaccine
  4. Waiting for 15 minutes after your vaccination to ensure you feel okay
  5. Going home with a sheet that indicates you have received your dose and what side effects you could expect.
If you have a fear of needles, require translation services or need any other help, call ahead to make those arrangements. If you have a history of fainting, dizziness or allergic reactions to needles, you are not eligible for drive-through vaccination options and should attend a clinic, hospital, pharmacy or pop-up.

*If you do not have a health card, there are clinics available to serve your needs. Typically, these clinics require one piece of ID. You do not need to have a health card to get vaccinated in Ontario. If you need support in finding a vaccination clinic that fits your needs, send us an email at outreach@missinformed.ca .




What are the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine?


Common side effects from the vaccine may include:

  • Body Pain
  • Redness and swelling around the site of injection
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Fever and nausea
Side effects after your second dose can be more severe than those from your first dose. These side effects are common and temporary. Having no side effects is also normal. Although very rare, severe side effects, including blood clots, heart inflammation, capillary leak syndrome, Guillain Barre Syndrome, or allergic reactions may occur. As of July 5th, 99.9% of vaccinated people have not had any of these severe side effects. Side effects to vaccines are always monitored. If you do develop any severe side effects, call 911 or go to your nearest hospital.

A diagram of the human body and the common side effects associated with the COVID-19 vaccines.





WHY


How


 

WHAT

What is COVID-19?


COVID-19 stands for the coronavirus disease, first identified in 2019. COVID-19 is caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2.




What are the COVID-19 variants?


If you are exposed to a virus, it will enter your body and replicate itself, creating more and more copies. A mutation occurs when a virus makes a mistake when replicating. If enough mutations occur and are repeated, it will become a variant strain. A 'variant of concern' is a version of the virus that is typically more infectious and deadly. As of July 2021, there are four COVID-19 variants of concern. The most concerning one in Ontario is the delta variant.




What is the COVID-19 vaccine?


The COVID-19 vaccine is an injection that teaches your body to defend itself from the virus. The vaccines approved by Health Canada are safe and effective. The vaccines rely on mRNA or a non-replicating viral vector to achieve immunity. These vaccines do not inject you with the live virus. You cannot get COVID-19 from the COVID-19 vaccines. A visual illustration of what mRNA is from Virus to Spike Protein to mRNA to the mRNA encapsulated by the vesicle to create the vaccine.




What COVID-19 vaccines are available?


There are two mRNA vaccines and two non-replicating viral vector (NRVV) vaccines approved for use in Canada:

  • Pfizer: 2 doses (mRNA)
  • Moderna: 2 doses (mRNA)
  • AstraZeneca: 2 doses (NRVV)
  • Johnson & Johnson: 1 dose (NRVV)




What is the best COVID-19 vaccine for me to get?


The vaccines approved by Health Canada are all safe and effective. The best vaccination you can get is the first vaccine available to you! If you have concerns about the vaccines, talk to your health care provider. It is safe to mix vaccine brands as recommended by public health guidelines. If you receive an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) as your first dose, you can receive either of the mRNA vaccines as your second dose. If you received AstraZeneca as your first dose, you can receive an mRNA vaccine as your second dose or another dose of AstraZeneca.




What can I expect when I go to get my COVID-19 vaccine?


Experiences can differ across vaccine clinics. Below is what you may expect if you are going to a scheduled appointment:

  1. Arriving and checking in with a volunteer
  2. Answering COVID-19-specific screening questions, and providing your health card*
  3. Sitting down with a qualified healthcare worker to receive your vaccine
  4. Waiting for 15 minutes after your vaccination to ensure you feel okay
  5. Going home with a sheet that indicates you have received your dose and what side effects you could expect.
If you have a fear of needles, require translation services or need any other help, call ahead to make those arrangements. If you have a history of fainting, dizziness or allergic reactions to needles, you are not eligible for drive-through vaccination options and should attend a clinic, hospital, pharmacy or pop-up.

*If you do not have a health card, there are clinics available to serve your needs. Typically, these clinics require one piece of ID. You do not need to have a health card to get vaccinated in Ontario. If you need support in finding a vaccination clinic that fits your needs, send us an email at outreach@missinformed.ca .




What are the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine?


Common side effects from the vaccine may include:

  • Body Pain
  • Redness and swelling around the site of injection
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Fever and nausea
Side effects after your second dose can be more severe than those from your first dose. These side effects are common and temporary. Having no side effects is also normal. Although very rare, severe side effects, including blood clots, heart inflammation, capillary leak syndrome, Guillain Barre Syndrome, or allergic reactions may occur. As of July 5th, 99.9% of vaccinated people have not had any of these severe side effects. Side effects to vaccines are always monitored. If you do develop any severe side effects, call 911 or go to your nearest hospital.

A diagram of the human body and the common side effects associated with the COVID-19 vaccines.





WHY

Why should I get vaccinated against COVID-19?


Once you are vaccinated, you are significantly less likely to get COVID-19. If you do get infected, you are less likely to experience severe side effects, need hospitalization or die from the virus. Even if you have had COVID-19, it is a good idea to get vaccinated as it provides a strong boost of protection. It is important to get vaccinated to prevent the virus from replicating and mutating into variants that can become resistant to the current vaccines. The virus can only mutate in infected people. If people are fully vaccinated, the virus will not have the chance to mutate and create more variants. Our best protection against the COVID-19 virus is to get vaccinated.




Why should I get a second dose?


If you received Pfizer, Moderna or AstraZeneca as your first dose, you need a second dose to be fully vaccinated. Being fully vaccinated offers you the greatest protection against COVID-19. You will be partially protected 2 weeks after your first dose, but your second dose will provide more effective, longer-term protection from all existing variants.




Why is herd immunity important?


Herd immunity happens when most people are immune to a specific disease, making that disease less likely to spread. Herd immunity helps protect those who cannot get vaccinated, such as newborns, from contracting the virus. Vaccination is critical towards reaching a point of herd immunity. Measles, mumps, polio, and chickenpox are infectious diseases that used to be very common. With the help of vaccines, we have reached herd immunity for each of these infectious diseases. Now, these diseases are very rare in countries with high vaccination rates. To achieve herd immunity against COVID-19, we need every eligible person to get vaccinated. The sooner we get fully vaccinated, the quicker life will return to normal.





How


 

WHAT

What is COVID-19?


COVID-19 stands for the coronavirus disease, first identified in 2019. COVID-19 is caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2.




What are the COVID-19 variants?


If you are exposed to a virus, it will enter your body and replicate itself, creating more and more copies. A mutation occurs when a virus makes a mistake when replicating. If enough mutations occur and are repeated, it will become a variant strain. A 'variant of concern' is a version of the virus that is typically more infectious and deadly. As of July 2021, there are four COVID-19 variants of concern. The most concerning one in Ontario is the delta variant.




What is the COVID-19 vaccine?


The COVID-19 vaccine is an injection that teaches your body to defend itself from the virus. The vaccines approved by Health Canada are safe and effective. The vaccines rely on mRNA or a non-replicating viral vector to achieve immunity. These vaccines do not inject you with the live virus. You cannot get COVID-19 from the COVID-19 vaccines. A visual illustration of what mRNA is from Virus to Spike Protein to mRNA to the mRNA encapsulated by the vesicle to create the vaccine.




What COVID-19 vaccines are available?


There are two mRNA vaccines and two non-replicating viral vector (NRVV) vaccines approved for use in Canada:

  • Pfizer: 2 doses (mRNA)
  • Moderna: 2 doses (mRNA)
  • AstraZeneca: 2 doses (NRVV)
  • Johnson & Johnson: 1 dose (NRVV)




What is the best COVID-19 vaccine for me to get?


The vaccines approved by Health Canada are all safe and effective. The best vaccination you can get is the first vaccine available to you! If you have concerns about the vaccines, talk to your health care provider. It is safe to mix vaccine brands as recommended by public health guidelines. If you receive an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) as your first dose, you can receive either of the mRNA vaccines as your second dose. If you received AstraZeneca as your first dose, you can receive an mRNA vaccine as your second dose or another dose of AstraZeneca.




What can I expect when I go to get my COVID-19 vaccine?


Experiences can differ across vaccine clinics. Below is what you may expect if you are going to a scheduled appointment:

  1. Arriving and checking in with a volunteer
  2. Answering COVID-19-specific screening questions, and providing your health card*
  3. Sitting down with a qualified healthcare worker to receive your vaccine
  4. Waiting for 15 minutes after your vaccination to ensure you feel okay
  5. Going home with a sheet that indicates you have received your dose and what side effects you could expect.
If you have a fear of needles, require translation services or need any other help, call ahead to make those arrangements. If you have a history of fainting, dizziness or allergic reactions to needles, you are not eligible for drive-through vaccination options and should attend a clinic, hospital, pharmacy or pop-up.

*If you do not have a health card, there are clinics available to serve your needs. Typically, these clinics require one piece of ID. You do not need to have a health card to get vaccinated in Ontario. If you need support in finding a vaccination clinic that fits your needs, send us an email at outreach@missinformed.ca .




What are the side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine?


Common side effects from the vaccine may include:

  • Body Pain
  • Redness and swelling around the site of injection
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Fever and nausea
Side effects after your second dose can be more severe than those from your first dose. These side effects are common and temporary. Having no side effects is also normal. Although very rare, severe side effects, including blood clots, heart inflammation, capillary leak syndrome, Guillain Barre Syndrome, or allergic reactions may occur. As of July 5th, 99.9% of vaccinated people have not had any of these severe side effects. Side effects to vaccines are always monitored. If you do develop any severe side effects, call 911 or go to your nearest hospital.

A diagram of the human body and the common side effects associated with the COVID-19 vaccines.





WHY

Why should I get vaccinated against COVID-19?


Once you are vaccinated, you are significantly less likely to get COVID-19. If you do get infected, you are less likely to experience severe side effects, need hospitalization or die from the virus. Even if you have had COVID-19, it is a good idea to get vaccinated as it provides a strong boost of protection. It is important to get vaccinated to prevent the virus from replicating and mutating into variants that can become resistant to the current vaccines. The virus can only mutate in infected people. If people are fully vaccinated, the virus will not have the chance to mutate and create more variants. Our best protection against the COVID-19 virus is to get vaccinated.




Why should I get a second dose?


If you received Pfizer, Moderna or AstraZeneca as your first dose, you need a second dose to be fully vaccinated. Being fully vaccinated offers you the greatest protection against COVID-19. You will be partially protected 2 weeks after your first dose, but your second dose will provide more effective, longer-term protection from all existing variants.




Why is herd immunity important?


Herd immunity happens when most people are immune to a specific disease, making that disease less likely to spread. Herd immunity helps protect those who cannot get vaccinated, such as newborns, from contracting the virus. Vaccination is critical towards reaching a point of herd immunity. Measles, mumps, polio, and chickenpox are infectious diseases that used to be very common. With the help of vaccines, we have reached herd immunity for each of these infectious diseases. Now, these diseases are very rare in countries with high vaccination rates. To achieve herd immunity against COVID-19, we need every eligible person to get vaccinated. The sooner we get fully vaccinated, the quicker life will return to normal.





How


 

WHERE

There are many places to get vaccinated across the province including pharmacies, doctor’s offices, hospitals and pop-up clinics.

Find the closest place to you and get vaccinated.
 

Book your appointment via the link below

 

COMMON 
QUESTIONS + MISCONCEPTIONS

Is it safe to mix vaccines?


It is safe to mix the COVID-19 vaccines. Mixing vaccines is not a new idea. It has been done in the past with Ebola, flu shots, and hepatitis vaccines. 

 

Mixing Astrazeneca with mRNA

New evidence suggests mixing AstraZeneca with an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer, Moderna) is highly effective and safe. There is also no known risk of blood clots with the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines. If you got Astrazeneca as your first dose, it is recommended you get either Pfizer or Moderna as your second dose. However, you can also get a second dose of Astrazeneca if you had no severe issues with your first dose. Once you have two doses, you are fully vaccinated and have the greatest protection against COVID-19.

 

Mixing mRNA with mRNA

The mRNA vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna) can also be mixed because they are so similar. Vaccines from different companies can be mixed when they:

  1. Have the same purpose

  2. Are used in the same populations

  3. Work in the same way

  4. Are equally safe

  5. Are equally effective

Looking at all these characteristics, the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are pretty much the same. This means that if you got Pfizer as your first shot, you can get Moderna as your second. If you got Moderna first, you can get Pfizer second.

The most important thing is to get the first vaccine available to you!

 

ATTEND OUR SEMINARS

SUPPORTING FRIENDS + FAMILY

August 11, 2021 - 6-7pm EST

This event will teach you everything you need to know about vaccines and how to educate friends and family.

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ASK AN EXPERT

To be announced

We invite you to join us to ask your vaccine-related questions to our panel of health experts from across Ontario.

TO BE ANNOUNCED

Have More Questions?

Is there anything else you would like to know about the vaccine rollout? If there is a question that you would like for us to look into please submit it here!

Thank you!